Help Your Child Make a Change

As is expected, children are constantly changing and growing. With change and new experiences can come anxiety and off-track behaviors. More opportunities for independence and freedom can bring up difficulties with separation from the parent. Fall is the time when many families either start new activities or join a preschool or daycare situation. This is a very exciting time as we are given a

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The Power of Touch

Loving Touch One of the most powerful ways to connect with your child is through touch. Hugs, holding hands, the sitting-in-lap connection, wrestling, and floor play all have benefits for parent and child. Human touch is vital to healthy brain development. In a Psychology Today post titled “The Neuroscience of Calming a Baby,”1 Christopher Bergland writes of the role that the cerebellum plays in proprioception –

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Bring in Early Childhood Preferences to Increase Learning and Connection

How can we light up children’s brains so they most easily learn? How does better understanding their development increase our connection together? The Young Brain Sometimes young children seem like a different species entirely from the adults who parent them. Conflict can occur just because the two people involved see the world very differently. This is partly due to the way the brain develops.

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How to Do a Do-Over

A Do-Over is an opportunity to repeat a behavior with the guidance of the parent. Any time you want to instill a new behavior or you want your child to have more respectful behavior – these are good times for Do-Overs. From chores to sibling disagreements, re-doing the scene not only allows for another try at doing it respectfully, but it stops the child’s

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Make Life Easier with a Routine Chart

I don’t know about where you live, but where I live, there’s lots of weather. And that often means an extra added amount of time to get out the door in the morning. Shirts, sweaters, pants, socks, mittens, jacket, hat… Just locating the needed items takes time and then there is the challenge to get it all on. Or maybe your child gets easily

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From the Inside Out: Self-Regulation

What is Self-Regulation? Self-Regulation is the ability to have conscious control over impulses. This is a function of the executive center of the brain – or the neocortex – an area that develops later in small children than some other parts of the brain. Development of Self-Regulation There are three main factors that influence the development of the ability to self-regulate: biology and temperament, developmental

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My Child is Rude…

Surly tones, “bad words,” mean comments…these can all feel disrespectful. One of the first questions I ask of parents, “Is there behavior to match the rudeness, or is it confined comments and tone?” If there is behavior to match, then it’s important to address the behavior. Here, we’ll focus on tone and language. Stay Calm If the rudeness remains in the realm of words and tone,

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Touch, Balance, Move – Encouraging Sensory Integration

Young children live and learn through their bodies. Without the distraction of verbal language and with immature cognitive development, young children live and learn through their bodies. They grow and learn about the world through their developing senses: vision, taste, smell, auditory, tactile (touch), vestibular (sense of balance), and proprioception (body awareness). We can help children to integrate what is received through these senses.  Learning to have

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Better Communication Through Personalized Stories

It’s not always easy communicating with our early childhood kids. Often, as soon as the child becomse verbal, parents are off and running with lots of words. There is often more “telling” than showing.  When trying to teach your child a new idea or action, it can seem like “in one ear and out the other.” The parent’s repeated and lengthy word count can

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Put on your Parent Cap and C.A.P.E.R.

It is natural to look toward the apparent cause of disturbance or distress when some aspect of family life is out of balance. Parents often think that if they can just get their child to change, all will be calm, peaceful, joyful, easier – or any of the adjectives that parents hope for when there is chaos in the home. The first suggestion is

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